Patients & Visitors

The Patient Experience

The Hospital staff will do everything possible to make your stay as comfortable as it can to speed your recuperation!

To assist in the healing process, you will be asked a number of questions by Admitting and Nursing personnel at the time of your admission. This information is necessary and we appreciate your cooperation. As part of the admitting process, Hospital staff will also complete a card with your room number and phone number which you may want to share with relatives and friends who plan to visit or call you.

Newspaper, Flower and Mail Delivery

Hospital staff delivers flowers and personal mail addressed to patients only. Complimentary copies of the local weekly newspapers are also provided to patients.

Television and Phone

Televisions and phones are made available to patients at no charge (except long distance calls). Televisions have access to all basic Dish Network channels and are adapted with “closed caption” for those patients who are hearing impaired. Local calls can be made by dialing “9” plus the desired number. Long distance calls can be made with the assistance of staff. Calls cannot be charged to the Hospital. The patient may ask the outside operator charge the call to their home phone or a phone company card.

Smoking

The Hospital is a smoke-free campus as of November 15, 2007, because smoking is a major health hazard and secondary smoke is dangerous to everyone, especially the Hospital’s patients. Patients who refrain from smoking contribute to their own recovery and often those patients who cease smoking during a hospital stay are motivated to break their habit for good. We ask that visitors respect the No Smoking Policy within the campus and leave the campus when they feel the need to smoke.

Clergy Visits

The Hospital staff will attempt to contact your pastor if you requested it when you were admitted to the Hospital. Unfortunately our staff is sometimes unsuccessful in completing the contact. We recommend that if you have not heard from your pastor within 24 hours, you or a family member should attempt to make direct contact.

For Your Safety

During your hospitalization different kinds of medical equipment may be used to provide treatments in your care. If you notice any equipment that is not functioning properly, please notify your nurse immediately so that he or she can correct the problem or assist in rectifying the situation.

While you are a patient, the Hospital staff may be alerted for a fire or disaster drill. Such drills are held to assure maximum safety to our patients. Therefore, please do not be disturbed or alarmed if you hear or see evidence of such a practice drill.

Going Home

When indicated by your physician or hospitalist, discharge and checkout from the Hospital will be coordinated with you and your family. Instructions for your care at home and other follow up care will be given to you personally by the Nursing staff. You will be accompanied out of the Hospital by a member of the Hospital staff.

Patient Care Evaluation

Random patients receive a Patient Care Satisfaction Survey after returning home. If you receive one of these questionnaires, we hope you will take the time to complete the form and mail it back to us. Surveys are also found in designated locations on the floor. All patients have the opportunity to complete a survey and return in an envelope. You may also receive a phone call from our hospital staff regarding your stay. These are just a few ways you can help us continue to improve the care and services we offer. Your assistance is greatly appreciated.

Legal and Ethical Practices

You can help ensure that Carlinville Area Hospital maintains the highest standards of legal and ethical excellence by helping enforce its Code of Conduct. This Code of Conduct tells how CAH conducts business properly and follows federal and state laws. As a patient, you are encouraged to call the CAH Compliance Line at 1-888-345-2676 to report any conductor behavior that may be illegal or unethical. Patients may report various acts and behaviors, including bad manners, something that puts a patient in danger, failure to provide prescribed care, stealing and not reporting problems with equipment. A separate company runs this “hotline” so you do not have to worry about being identified for reporting wrongdoing.

Nursing/Staffing Information

In an effort to ensure patient safety and public trust, anyone can inquire about our staffing levels and staff competence. To make an appointment with the Chief Nursing Officer or Quality Manager, please call 217-854-3141, ext. 365. All questions will be answered in accordance with the 2004 Illinois Hospital Report Card Act.

Visitor Information

This policy applies to Carlinville Area Hospital, its physicians and clinical staff members, and all Hospital personnel involved in the decision-making process with respect to patient visitation for all inpatients and outpatients. The goal is to ensure that all visitors of patients at CAH enjoy equal visitation privileges consistent with patient preferences, subject to the Hospital’s Justified Clinical Restrictions.

By definition, Justified Clinical Restrictions means any clinically necessary or reasonable restriction or limitation imposed by the Hospital on a patient’s visitation rights when a restriction or limitation is necessary to provide safe care to the patient or other patients. Justified Clinical Restrictions may include, but are not limited to, one or more of the following:

  • A court order limiting or restraining contact
  • Behavior presenting a direct risk or threat to the patient, Hospital staff or others in the immediate environment
  • Behavior disruptive of the functioning of the patient care unit
  • Reasonable limitations on the number of visitors at any one time
  • Patient’s risk of infection by the visitor
  • Visitor’s risk of infection by the patient
  • Extraordinary protections because of a pandemic or infectious disease outbreak
  • Substance abuse treatment protocols requiring restricted visitation
  • Patient’s need for privacy or rest
  • When a patient is undergoing a clinical intervention or procedure and the treating health professional believes it is in the best interest of the patient to limit visitation during the clinical intervention or procedure.

Policy:

  1. We recognize the patient’s need to maintain contact with the community in which he/she has lived or is familiar. Therefore, the patient is permitted to have visitors as he/she permits.
  2. The patient may visit with immediate family or other relatives any time subject to the protection of the rights and safety of other patients and any restrictions imposed by the patient.
  3. Patients are permitted to visit with representatives from federal and state survey agencies, patient advocates, the State long-term care ombudsman, protection and advocacy agencies for individuals with developmental disabilities or mental illness, clergy and/or their personal physician at any time.
  4. The patient has the right to deny visitation at any time.
  5. The hospital reserves the right to limit the number of visitors in the room at any given time.
  6. A critically ill patient may have visitors of his/her choice at any time, as long as visitation is not medically contraindicated. (NOTE: The patient’s care plan identifies visitor restriction information.)
  7. The hospital reserves the right to change the location of a visit if such visit infringes upon other patients in the hospital.
  8. Unless otherwise permitted by the patient, visitors will be required to wait outside the room or in the lobby while the patient is receiving treatment, undergoing examinations, and/or receiving personal care.
  9. Disruptive visitors may be asked to leave the hospital.
  10. Space is available in the lobby for patients to receive guests in reasonable comfort.
  11. A patient has the right to no visitors.

General Visitor Information

Carlinville Area Hospital will permit patients to receive visitors subject to the patient’s wishes and the protection of the rights of other patients in the hospital.

  • We recognize the patient’s need to maintain contact with the community in which he/she has lived or is familiar. Therefore, the patient is permitted to have visitors as he/she permits.
  • The patient may visit with immediate family or other relatives any time subject to the protection of the rights and safety of other patients and any restrictions imposed by the patient.
  • Patients are permitted to visit with representatives from federal and state survey agencies, patient advocates, the State long-term care ombudsman, protection and advocacy agencies for individuals with developmental disabilities or mental illness, clergy and/or their personal physician at any time.
  • The patient has the right to deny visitation at any time.
  • The hospital reserves the right to limit the number of visitors in the room at any given time.
  • A critically ill patient may have visitors of his/her choice at any time, as long as visitation is not medically contraindicated. (NOTE: The patient’s care plan identifies visitor restriction information.)
  • The hospital reserves the right to change the location of a visit if such visit infringes upon other patients in the hospital.
  • Unless otherwise permitted by the patient, visitors will be required to wait outside the room or in the lobby while the patient is receiving treatment, undergoing examinations, and/or receiving personal care.
  • Disruptive visitors may be asked to leave the hospital.
  • Space is available in the lobby for patients to receive guests in reasonable comfort.
  • A patient has the right to no visitors.
  • Soda, snack and other vending machines are available in the Cafeteria for visitors’ convenience. Coffee and iced tea are complimentary. At patient meal times, a guest tray is available for one person staying “around the clock” with a patient. Please notify the Nursing staff if you wish to arrange for a meal at a cost of $4.00 payable when the tray is delivered.

Billing and Insurance

Your Hospital Bill

You may receive a bill for your Hospital stay. If you have any questions about any portion of your Hospital bill or need to make special arrangements for payment, a member of our Finance Department will be happy to assist you. Payment of bills may be made by mail, online, or in person. The Hospital Cashier’s Office, located inside the main entrance, is happy to help you. Hours are Monday-Friday from 8 am-4:30 pm.

Billing For Professional Services

Please note that both inpatients and outpatients who require x-rays will receive a separate bill from the radiologist who reads the x-rays. The Hospital radiologists read all x-rays to insure proper diagnosis and treatment for all patients. Also, all patients who require laboratory tests will receive a Hospital bill for testing and lab services. The pathologist fees will be billed separately for professional services in examining and analyzing blood, cells, tissue or other specimens, reporting the findings and consulting with the attending physician when appropriate.

Out-of-Network Provider Notification

  1. The patient may receive separate bills for services provided by health care professionals affiliated with the hospital.
  2. If applicable, some hospital staff members may not be participating providers in the same insurance plans and networks as the Hospital.
  3. If applicable, the patient may have a greater financial responsibility for services provided by healthcare professionals at the Hospital who are not under contract with the patient’s health care plan.
  4. Questions about coverage or benefit levels should be directed to the patient’s health care plan and the patient’s certificate of coverage.

 

Medicare

A Message from Medicare

Your Rights as a Hospital Patient:

  • You have the right to receive necessary hospital services covered by Medicare, or covered by your Medicare Health Plan (“Your plan”) if you are a Plan enrollee.
  • You have the right to know about any decisions that the hospital, your doctor, your Plan, or anyone else makes about your hospital stay and who will pay for it.
  • Your doctor, your Plan, or the Hospital should arrange for services you will need after you leave the Hospital. Medicare or your Plan may cover some care in your home (home health care) and other kinds of care, if ordered by your doctor or by your Plan. You have a right to know about these services, who will pay for them, and where you can get them. If you have any questions, talk to your doctor or Plan, or talk to other hospital personnel.

Your Hospital Discharge and Medicare Appeal Rights

Date of Discharge: When your doctor or Plan determines that you can be discharged from the Hospital, you will be advised of your planned date of discharge. You may appeal if you think that you are being asked to leave the hospital too soon. If you stay in the hospital after your planned date of discharge, it is likely that your charges for additional days in the hospital will not be covered by Medicare or your Plan.

Your Right to an Immediate Appeal without Financial Risk: When you are advised of your planned date of discharge, if you think you are being asked to leave the hospital too soon, you have the right to appeal to your Quality Improvement Organization (also known as QIO). The QIO is authorized by Medicare to provide a second opinion about your readiness to leave. You may call Medicare toll free, 24hours a day, at 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) or TTY/TTD: 1-877-486-2048, for more information on asking your QIO for a second opinion. If you appeal to the QIO by noon of the day after you receive a non coverage notice, you are not responsible for paying for the days you stay in the hospital during the QIO review, even if the QIO disagrees with you. The QIO will decide within one day after it receives the necessary information.

Other Appeal Rights: If you miss the deadline for filing an immediate appeal, you may still request a review by the QIO (or by your Plan, if you are a Plan enrollee) before you leave the hospital. However, you will have to pay for the costs of your additional days in the hospital if the QIO (or your Plan) denies your appeal. You may file for this review at the address or telephone number of the QIO (or your Plan).

Medicare Coverage of Prescription Drugs, Outpatients, Observation Patients and Emergency Room Patients

The Medicare program provides limited benefits for outpatient drugs:

  • Under Medicare Part A (inpatient), drugs are covered that are provided during acute inpatient stays or qualified skilled nursing facilities if Medicare requirements are met.
  • Under Medicare Part B (outpatient, including outpatient hospital stays), drug coverage is limited to drugs that are not usually self-administered.

Even though hospitals are not required to give prior notice in order to bill a beneficiary for self-administered drugs provided in the outpatient setting, Carlinville Area Hospital has elected to inform you that you may receive a bill for these medications.

During the course of your outpatient treatment, you may be given medication that is considered self-administered by Medicare. Medicare defines self-administered drugs as medications that the patient could, in another setting, take him or herself 50% of the time. The list of medications includes but is not limited to tablets, capsules, caplets, elixirs, sprays, drops, inhalants and some injectable drugs.

Medications brought from home in their original pharmacy container, properly labeled and positively identified by pharmacy, may be used with a physician order. If we are able to use your home medication, you will not receive a bill for these medications.

When coming to the hospital for outpatient admission, to see a physician, receive outpatient services or use the Emergency Room, always try to bring any medication (in its original pharmacy container) that you have been taking. In order to remain compliant with Medicare regulations related to the billing of these drugs, medical providers are required to submit self-administered drugs as non-covered items on our billing to Medicare.

You will receive a bill from the hospital following payment of our claim by Medicare. In addition to any deductible and co-insurance due, this bill will reflect the charges for unpaid self-administered drugs. You will be expected to pay for the non-covered items. With few exceptions, most secondary insurance carriers do not cover self-administered drugs. You may request an itemized statement for billing of the self-administered drugs to a Medicare Part D carrier.

If you have any questions, you may call our Business Office: 217-854-3141, ext 356. If you would like additional information about your coverage by Medicare, you can call 1-800-633-4227 or visit www.medicare.gov to get help with your Medicare questions.

Are You a Hospital Inpatient or Outpatient? If You Have Medicare – Ask!

Did you know that even if you stay in the hospital overnight, you might still be considered an “outpatient”? Your hospital status (whether the hospital considers you an “inpatient” or “outpatient”) affects how much you pay for hospital services (like X-rays, drugs, and lab tests). Your hospital status may also affect whether Medicare will cover care you get in a skilled nursing facility (SNF). An inpatient admission begins the day you’re formally admitted to the hospital with a doctor’s order. The day before you’re discharged is your last inpatient day. You’re an outpatient if you’re getting emergency department services, observation services, lab tests, or X-rays, and the doctor hasn’t written an order to admit you as an inpatient even if you spend the night at the hospital.

If you’re in the hospital more than a few hours, always ask your doctor or the hospital staff if you’re an inpatient or an outpatient.

Read on to understand the differences in Original Medicare coverage for hospital inpatients and outpatients and how these rules apply to some common situations. If you have a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO), costs and coverage may be different. Check with your plan.

What do I pay as an inpatient?

Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) covers inpatient hospital services. Generally, this means you pay a one-time deductible for all of your hospital services for the first 60 days you’re in the hospital. Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers most of your doctor services when you’re an inpatient. You pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount for doctor services after paying the Part B deductible.

What do I pay as an outpatient?

Medicare Part B covers outpatient hospital and doctor services. Generally, this means you pay a co-payment for each individual outpatient hospital service. This amount may vary by service. Note: The co-payment amount for a single outpatient hospital service can’t be more than the inpatient hospital deductible. In some cases, your total co-payment for all services may be more than the inpatient hospital deductible. Part B also covers most of your doctor services when you’re a hospital outpatient. You pay 20% of the Medicare approved amount after the Part B deductible. Generally, the prescription and over-the-counter drugs you get in an outpatient setting like an emergency department (sometimes called “self-administered drugs”) aren’t covered by Part B. If you have Medicare Part D prescription drug coverage, these drugs may be covered under certain circumstances. You will likely need to pay out-of-pocket for these drugs and submit a claim to your drug plan for a refund. Call your plan for more information. For more detailed information on how Medicare covers hospital services, including premiums, deductibles, and co-payments, visit www.medicare.gov/Publications/Pubs/pdf/10050.pdf to view the “Medicare & You” handbook. You may also call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048.

Below are some common situations and a description of how Medicare will pay. Remember, you pay deductibles, coinsurance, and co-payments.

Situation Inpatient or Outpatient Part A Pays Part B Pays
You’re in the emergency department, and then you’re formally admitted to the hospital with a doctor’s order. Inpatient Your hospital stay usually including emergency department services Your doctor services
You visit the emergency department for a broken arm, get X-rays and a cast, and go home. Outpatient Nothing Doctor services and hospital outpatient services (for example, emergency department visit, X-rays, casting)
You come to the emergency department with chest pain, and the hospital keeps you for 2 nights for observation services. Outpatient Nothing Doctor services and hospital outpatient services (for example, emergency department visit, observation services, lab tests, EKGs)
You come to the hospital for outpatient surgery, but they keep you overnight for high blood pressure. Your doctor doesn’t write an order to admit you as an inpatient. You go home the next day. Outpatient Nothing Doctor services and hospital outpatient services
Your doctor writes an order for you to be admitted as an inpatient and the hospital later tells you they’re changing your status to outpatient. Your doctor must agree, and the hospital must tell you in writing—while you’re still in the hospital—that your status changed. Outpatient Nothing Doctor services and hospital outpatient services

 

REMEMBER: Even if you stay overnight in a regular hospital bed, you might be an outpatient. Ask the doctor or hospital.

How would my hospital status affect the way that Medicare covers the care I get in a skilled nursing facility?

Medicare will only cover care you get in a Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) if you first have a “qualifying hospital stay.” A qualifying hospital stay means you’ve been a hospital inpatient for at least 3 consecutive nights (counting the day you were admitted as an inpatient, but not counting the day of your discharge). If you don’t have a 3-night inpatient hospital stay, ask if you can get care after your discharge in other settings (like home health care) or if any other programs (like Medicaid or Veterans’ benefits) can cover your SNF care. Always ask your doctor or hospital staff if Medicare will cover your SNF stay.

How would a hospital’s observation services affect my SNF coverage?

Your doctor may order “observation services” to help decide whether you need to be admitted to the hospital as an inpatient or can be discharged. During the time you’re getting observation services in the hospital, you’re considered an outpatient. This means you can’t count this time towards the 3-day inpatient hospital stay needed for Medicare to cover your SNF stay. For more information about how Medicare covers care in a SNF, visit www.medicare.gov/Publications/Pubs/pdf/10153.pdf to view the booklet “Medicare Coverage of Skilled Nursing Facility Care.”

Below are some common hospital situations that may affect your SNF coverage.

Situation Is your SNF stay covered?
You came to the emergency department and were formally admitted to the hospital with a doctor’s order as an inpatient for 3 days, and you were discharged on the fourth day. Yes, you met the 3-night inpatient stay requirement for a covered SNF stay.
You came to the emergency department and spent 1 day getting observation services. Then, you were an inpatient for 2 more days. No. Even though you spent 3 nights in the hospital, you were considered an outpatient while getting emergency department and observation services. These days don’t count toward the 3-day inpatient stay requirement.

 

Remember: An inpatient admission begins the day you’re formally admitted to the hospital with a doctor’s order. That date is your first inpatient day. The day you are discharged doesn’t count as an inpatient day.

What are my rights?

No matter what type of Medicare coverage you have, you have certain guaranteed rights. As a person with Medicare, you have the right to all of the following:

  • Have your questions about Medicare answered
  • Learn about all of your treatment choices and participate in treatment decisions
  • Get a decision about health care payment or services, or prescription drug coverage
  • Get a review of (appeal) certain decisions about health care payment, coverage of services, or prescription drug coverage
  • File complaints (sometimes called grievances), including complaints about the quality of your care
  • For more information about your rights, the different levels of appeals, and Medicare notices, visit medicare.gov/Publications/Pubs/pdf/10112.pdf to view the booklet “Your Medicare Rights and Protections.” You can also call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048.

Where can I get more help?

  • For more information on Part A and Part B coverage, read your “Medicare & You” handbook,or call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227). TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048.
  • For more information about coverage of self-administered drugs, view the publication “How Medicare Covers Self-administered Drugs Given in Outpatient Settings” by visiting medicare.gov/Publications/Pubs/pdf/11333.pdf.
  • To ask questions or report complaints about the quality of care for a Medicare-covered service, call your Quality Improvement Organization (QIO). Call 1-800-MEDICARE to get the telephone number. Or, visit medicare.gov, and select “Find Helpful Numbers and Websites.”

 

Insurance Plans Accepted

  • Anthem Select Advantage
  • Beechstreet
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Acute
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield Swing
  • Care Improvement Plus
  • Cigna Healthcare of Il.
  • Coventry,  CCN, First Health
  • Coventry Medicare Advantage
  • Essence Healthcare
  • Great West
  • Health Alliance
  • Health Alliance Medicare Advantage
  • Healthlink PPO
  • Healthlink HMO
  • HFN, PPO
  • HFN, WMC
  • Humana Gold Medicare
  • Multi Health Plan/PHCS
  • Physicians Health Association of Il (PHAI)
  • Sterling Life
  • Sterling Option One
  • Tricare
  • United Healthcare
  • United Healthcare Medicare Complete

Rapid Response Team

Our focus is patients first and quality always. Carlinville Area Hospital understands that you and your family know you best. Our Rapid Response is an effort to address the needs of our patients and their families in case of an emergency or when the patient or their family feel urgent attention is necessary.

Rapid Response Team (RRT)

When there is a perception of a significant change in your condition or the condition of your loved one, or if “something just doesn’t seem right,” a Rapid Response Team (RRT ) can be summoned. Our RRT consists of an emergency department physician, emergent care nurse, respiratory therapist and nursing supervisor.

When to call the RRT

If you’ve already spoken to your nurse or physician and you still feel as though the condition is worsening and/or you haven’t gotten the response needed, call the RRT on an in-house phone. Let our operator know you wish to call the RRT.

Call 777 for Rapid Response if you’re still concerned

You or your family member can call the Rapid Response Team by dialing 777 on a hospital telephone. Once called, the RRT will respond within approximately 5 minutes to quickly assess the patients concerning decline in condition and, if necessary, to start interventions to prevent a medical emergency.

Observation Care

Although outpatient observation stays are now commonplace in hospitals, you may be unfamiliar with what it actually means to you, the patient. Following are some frequently asked questions and answers that will help you better understand outpatient observation status and billing.

What is outpatient observation?

Observation services are hospital outpatient services that a physician orders to allow for testing and medical evaluation of your condition.

While under observation care, your room may be located anywhere in the hospital. However, the quality of care is exactly the same regardless if you are an observation patient or inpatient admission.

Within the first 48 hours of your stay, the physician will decide whether you require an inpatient stay, or may be discharged home for care in another setting.

What kinds of conditions usually require observation care?

Observation services are typically ordered for conditions that can be treated in 48 hours or less, or when the cause for your symptoms has not yet been determined. Some examples are nausea, vomiting, weakness, stomach pain, headache, kidney stones, fever, some breathing problems, and some types of chest pain.

Does observation care count toward my three-day hospital stay for skilled care?

No. Any of your time spent during an observation stay does not count toward Medicare’s three-night (consecutive) hospital stay rule to qualify for skilled nursing home placement. If your status changes from observation to inpatient, your three-day hospital day begins only from the time when you become an inpatient.

How is an observation stay billed?

An observation stay is billed under outpatient services (under Medicare this would be under Part B) while an inpatient admission is billed under inpatient services (under Medicare this would be billed under Part A).

What am I expected to pay for as an observation patient?

Since observation stays are billed as an outpatient service, your insurance co-pays and deductibles, along with any additional costs, will probably be based on the outpatient terms of your policies. Your out-of-pocket costs may change depending on whether your stay is designated as observation or full inpatient admission.

Therefore, any costs from a nursing home following an observation stay or any inpatient hospital stay less than three days are the responsibility of the patient and will not be covered by Medicare as a Part B service.

What if my physician decides my condition requires acute inpatient care?

Your physician must then write an order to convert your outpatient observation stay to a full inpatient admission.

What if my physician decides that I do not require inpatient care?

You will be discharged from the hospital.

Can I be placed into outpatient observation after undergoing an outpatient surgical procedure?

It is possible. For example, Medicare allows for a 4-6 hour recovery period. The intent of outpatient surgery is to have your surgery and be discharged the same day. However, if you experience a postoperative complication, then your physician may place you into observation to monitor you further.

If I want to spend the night after my outpatient surgery, will Medicare cover this?

No, Medicare will only pay if there is a medical condition that warrants postoperative monitoring. If you desire to stay over for patient/family convenience, you will be fully responsible for payment.

 

Cafeteria

Hospital Cafeteria Information

Complimentary coffee, tea and water

Monday – Friday

4:00 a.m…………………………Variety of pastries available all day

10:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m……..Hot lunch and salad bar ($4.00-$4.50 per meal)

6:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m……..Grab and Go Refrigerator. Includes a variety of breakfast foods, sandwiches, desserts and drinks

Weekends

4:00 a.m…………………………Variety of pastries available all day

6:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m……..Grab and Go Refrigerator. Includes a variety of breakfast foods, sandwiches, desserts and drinks

Salads and cold sandwiches available to order by calling X237 (weekends only)

No hot lunch on weekends

Payments accepted – Check or cash. ATM is available 24/7 in the cafeteria.

Vending machines located in cafeteria.

For local dining options, please see a staff member for menus.